Bammy awards

Board of Governors


Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at the Stanford University School of Education, where she launched the School Redesign Network, the Stanford Educational Leadership Institute, and the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education. Darling-Hammond is author or editor of more than a dozen books and more than 300 articles on education policy and practice. Her work focuses on school restructuring, teacher education, and educational equity. She was education advisor to Barack Obama's presidential campaign. Prior to her appointment at Stanford, Darling-Hammond was the William F. Russell Professor in the Foundations of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Darling-Hammond was president of the American Educational Research Association and a member of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. She has served on the boards of directors for the Spencer Foundation, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and the Alliance for Excellent Education. Darling-Hammond received her B.A. magna cum laude at Yale University in 1973, and an Ed.D., with highest distinction, in urban education at Temple University in 1978.


Timothy P.Shriver, Ph.D. is is the Chairman & CEO of Special Olympics. Timothy has worked with world leaders such as Nelson Mandela, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, Bertie Ahern, Rafiq Hariri, Thabo Mbeki, Julius Nyerere, and Shimon Peres to advance the growth of the Special Olympics mission and vision. Before joining Special Olympics in 1995, Shriver was and remains a leading educator focusing on the social and emotional factors in learning. He co-founded and currently chairs the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), the leading research organization in the field of social and emotional learning.


Dr. Diane Ravitch is a research professor of education at New York University and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. Diane was Assistant Secretary of Education and Counselor to Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander in the administration of President George H.W. Bush. She was responsible for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement in the U.S. Department of Education. As Assistant Secretary, she led the federal effort to promote the creation of voluntary state and national academic standards. She is the author of several books, including The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education (2010).


Freeman Hrabowski III has served as President of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. He chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the recent report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. He also was recently named by President Obama to chair the newly created President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. In 2008, he was named one of America’s Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report, which ranked UMBC the nation’s #1 “Up and Coming” university the past four years (2009-12). During this period, U.S. News also consistently ranked UMBC among the nation’s leading institutions for “Best Undergraduate Teaching” – tied in 2012 with Duke, Cal-Berkeley, the University of Chicago, and Notre Dame. TIME magazine named him one of America’s 10 Best College Presidents in 2009, and one of the “100 Most Influential People in the World” in 2012.


Dr. Mark Ginsberg is dean of the College of Education and Human Development at George Mason University. Dr. Ginsberg's career spans a 30-year period as a professor, and as a skilled administrator. Dr. Ginsberg served as the executive director of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) from January 1999 until July 2010. NAEYC is the nation's largest professional association dedicated to improving the quality and accessibility of early care and education programs for children from birth through age eight. Dr. Ginsberg has published extensively in the areas of education, human development, and human services. He has lectured and presented at over 200 conferences, seminars, and other educational meetings and professional development events both within the United States and internationally. He is president-elect of the International Step by Step Association, a nongovernmental organization of 30 education-focused NGOs in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.


Gail Connelly is Executive Director of the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP) in Alexandria, Virginia, serving 28,000 K-8 principals and 35 million students in the United States of America and other affiliates worldwide. Gail has also served as a strategic planning, management, and fundraising consultant for several national and state education organizations, including the National PTA.


Jay Mathews is an author and education columnist with the Washington Post. Educated at Harvard, Mathews has won the Education Writers Association National Education Reporting Award and the Benjamin Fine Award for Outstanding Education Reporting, as well as the Eugene Meyer Award, The Washington Post's top honor for distinguished service to the newspaper. His rating system for U.S. high schools, the Challenge Index, appears every year in Newsweek and the Post. It has been cited in hundreds of newspapers and magazines since 1998 and is often the most-visited feature on the Newsweek.com Web site. His most successful book is his most recent, "Work Hard. Be Nice - How Two Inspired Teachers Created the Most Promising Schools in America." The story of how KIPP school founders Dave Levin and Mike Feinberg raised the achievement of impoverished students to new heights was a New York Times bestseller in 2009.


Rosemarie T. Truglio, Ph.D. is the vice-president of research and education for Sesame Workshop. During her seven years with Sesame Street, she has helped to ensure that the creative process always embraces the major curriculum points in a safe, sensitive, responsible and age-appropriate manner. Dr. Truglio is a widely published expert on child development, whose articles appear in child and developmental psychology journals. In 2001, she co-edited G is for Growing: 30 Years of Research on Sesame Street & Children with Sholly Fisch. A former assistant professor of Communication and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, Dr. Truglio also serves on the advisory board of the Children's Digital Media Center and the Council on Excellence in Children's Media at Annenberg School.


Dennis Van Roekel is president of the 3.2 million-member National Education Association. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Iowa in Iowa City and a master’s degree in math education from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. He taught math for more than 20 years at Paradise Valley High School in Phoenix, Arizona. He has held key positions in all levels of the teachers union, including Paradise Valley Education Association President, Arizona Education Association President, and served two terms as NEA Secretary-Treasurer, and NEA Vice President. He was elected NEA President by the 2008 NEA Representative Assembly, succeeding Reg Weaver in that position.[


Daniel Domenech is executive director of the American Association of School Administrators (AASA). A native of Cuba who moved to the U.S. at the age of nine, Domenech has more than 36 years of experience in public education. Prior to joining AASA, Domenech served as senior vice president of the Urban Advisory Resource for McGraw-Hill Education and served for six years as superintendent of the Fairfax County, Virginia.



Nancy Carlsson-Paige is a professor of early childhood education at Lesley University where she has taught teachers for more than 30 years, and was a founder of the University's Center for Peaceable Schools. Her most recent book is called Taking Back Childhood: A Proven Roadmap for Raising Confident, Creative, Compassionate Kids. Nancy is an advocate for policies and practices that promote children's well being and encourage skills and attitudes that further peace and nonviolence. Paige is also the mother of education advocate and actor Matt Damon and honorary co-chair of the Academy of Education Arts and Sciences.


Nelson Davis has been a broadcast media executive for over 30 years. His positions have included, Programming Executive for NBC Television Network; Executive Producer for Name That Tune and the Jeopardy pilot for Merv Griffin. .At NBC for 4 years, he moved from Broadcast Standards on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson to Director of Daytime Programming for the network. As president of Nelson Davis Television Productions he received numerous honors including four Emmy Awards. For the past eleven years Davis has served on the board of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation. Nelson is a special advisor to the Academy of Education Arts and Sciences on the best practices of managing a national awards program.

Rhian EvansAllvin is the Executive Director of NAEYC. Before joining NAEYC, Evans Allvin was a guiding force in Arizona's early childhood movement for more than 15 years. In 2006 she co-wrote the citizen's ballot initiative that created First Things First (FTF) which set aside Arizona's tobacco tax monies for children birth to five and created a state agency whose purpose is to ensure all Arizona children start kindergarten prepared to be successful in school and in life. Then-governor Janet Napolitano appointed her to FTF's state board, where she served for four years before resigning to become the organization's chief executive officer (CEO). Rhian has authored a number of white papers, articles, policy briefs, and reports on various topics. She coauthored a report on the state of early care and education in Arizona, Building Our Foundation: Assessing Early Care and Education in Arizona, for the Arizona Community Foundation. She has given numerous presentations to diverse local and national audiences. Rhian holds a bachelor's degree from Northern Arizona University and a master's degree in business administration from Arizona State University. She is married to Paul Allvin, and they live in Falls Church, Virginia, with their three young children.


Andrew J. Rotherham is a co-founder and partner at Bellwether Education, a non-profit organization working to improve educational outcomes for low-income students, and he writes the blog Eduwonk. Rotherham previously served as Special Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy during the Clinton administration and is a former member of the Virginia Board of Education. Rotherham is on the board of directors for the Indianapolis Mind Trust, is Vice Chair of the Curry School of Education Foundation at the University of Virginia, and serves on the Visiting Committee for the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He also writes the weekly “School of Thought” column for TIME.com as well as the blog Eduwonk.com and is the co-publisher of “Education Insider” a federal policy research tool produced by Whiteboard Advisors.


Betsy Landers is president of the National Parent Teachers Associaton (NPTA) . Her role in National PTA also included chairing the National PTA Advisory Board, the National Council of States, the Strategic Plan Committee, the Resource Development Committee, and the Finance Committee. Landers has been actively involved in negotiating new partnerships and alliances for the association to increase PTA's role in serving diverse families. As Tennessee PTA State President, Landers led that organization in working with the State Board of Education and several legislators to write what would become the Parent Involvement Act. This Tennessee law mandates that all school districts in the state have a written parent involvement policy. In 2004, she was honored with the Shelby County Schools Board of Education Community Service Award and in 2002, was named one of the "50 Women Who Make a Difference" by Memphis Women's Magazine.


Jon Bergmann is considered one of the pioneers in the Flipped Class Movement -- in fact, he co-wrote the book on the Flipped Classroom, available from ISTE Press in June 2012. Bergmann believes educators should ask one guiding question: What is best for my students in my classroom? To the best of his abilities he has done this in his two-plus decades as a high school science teacher. He received the Presidential Award for Excellence for Math and Science Teaching in 2002 and was named Semi-Finalist for Colorado Teacher of the Year in 2010. He blogs at flipped-learning.com. He is the Lead Technology Facilitator for the Joseph Sears School in Kenilworth, Illinois.


JoAnne Bartoletti is executive director of the National Association of Secondary School Principals. Bartoletti has served as executive director of NJPSA since 1991, during which time she revolutionized the product, service, and professional development offerings for the organization’s 7,400 member administrators and raised the profile of NJ administrators in public policy circles. During her tenure, Bartoletti partnered with the state department of education on a nontraditional principal certification program that greatly expanded the pool of competent school leaders by enabling professionals with advanced degrees in areas other than education to become principals. She is a recognized and often-consulted authority in education policy in New Jersey. Prior to her tenure at NJPSA, Bartoletti served as assistant principal and principal at West Windsor-Plainsboro (NJ) High School, which was ranked as one of the top 10 schools in New Jersey in 1989.  

Dan Pink has written five provocative best selling books including A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future which charts the rise of right-brain thinking in modern economies and describes the six abilities individuals and organizations must master in an outsourced, automated age. A Whole New Mind is a long-running New York Times bestseller that has been translated into 24 languages. Dan served in the White House from 1995 to 1997 as chief speechwriter to Vice President Al Gore. He also worked as an aide to U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich.He received a BA from Northwestern University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and a JD from Yale Law School.


Randi Weingraten is president of the 1.5 million-member American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO, which represents teachers; paraprofessionals and school-related personnel; higher education faculty and staff; nurses and other healthcare professionals; local, state and federal government employees; and early childhood educators. The AFT champions fairness; democracy; economic opportunity; and high-quality public education, healthcare and public services for students, their families and communities. The AFT and its members advance these principles through community engagement, organizing, collective bargaining and political activism, and especially through members’ work.


Caroline Hendrie is the executive director of the Education Writers Association, the national professional organization for members of the news media who specialize in education. She oversees strategy, operations and programming, in support of the nonprofit organization's mission to expand the quantity and quality of education coverage through relevant training, support, resources and recognition. A graduate of Wesleyan University, Ms. Hendrie was herself an education journalist for more than two decades. She ended her career in daily and weekly newspapers in 2010 as managing editor of Education Week, where she had held various writing and editing positions since 1996. As a reporter, she covered national policy areas including urban education, school reform, philanthropy and legal affairs, and won various reporting awards from state and national organizations.  

 b Thomas Armstrong, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of the American Institute for Learning and Human Development and an award-winning author and speaker who has been an educator for the past forty-one years. He is the author of fifteen books which have been translated into twenty-six languages.  They include:  Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, In Their Own Way, 7 Kinds of Smart, The Myth of the A.D.D. Child  and The Power of Neurodiversity:  Unleashing the Advantages of Your Differently Wired Brain. He has written for Ladies Home Journal, Family Circle,  and Parenting, and articles featuring his work have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, USA Today, and Good Housekeeping.  He has given  nearly one thousand workshops, keynotes, and lectures in forty-four states and twenty-three countries over the past twenty-eight years.


Dr. George A. Giuliani is the executive director of The National Association of Special Education Teachers, Executive Director of the American Academy of Special Education Professionals, and President of the National Association of Parents with Children in Special Education. Dr. Giuliani earned is a full-time tenured Associate Professor at Hofstra University's School of Education and Allied Human Services in the Department of Counseling, Research, Special Education, and Rehabilitation. He is the Director of the Special Education Program at Hofstra University's Graduate School.


Stephanie Hirsh is executive director of Learning Forward. Learning Forward’s more than 10,000 members and 40 state and provincial affiliates are committed to increasing student achievement and educator performance through effective professional learning. Before her appointment as executive director, Hirsh served the association as deputy executive director for 18 years. She began her career as a secondary teacher and later served as a school district administrator in the Richardson (Texas) Independent School District. In 1996 she was elected to the Richardson school board and served for three terms. Today, Hirsh advises governors, legislators, state and local superintendents, foundation leaders, and other policy makers on improving student learning through effective professional learning and school improvement.


Bill Bushaw is the executive director of the PDK International family of associations, which includes the Future Educators Association® for precollegiate prospective educators; Pi Lambda Theta, a collegiate honor society; and PDK, a prestigious professional association of educators. A retired captain in the U.S. Navy, Bushaw has a wide range of experience in education having served as a teacher, principal, director of the North Central Association (NCA) in Michigan, and as deputy superintendent at the Michigan Department of Education. Bushaw’s Ph.D. in education policy is from the University of Michigan. His professional interests center on policy, student assessment, and school accountability.


Michael Redburn is executive director of the American Association of School Personnel Administrators (AASPA). Redburn has 37 years of experience in public education. He has served as a teacher, school principal, curriculum director, human resource administrator, superintendent of schools, university professor in educational leadership, and association director. Redburn holds a B.A. in Education from the University of Northern Colorado, a M.Ed. in Educational Administration from the University of Wyoming, and an Ed.D. in Educational Administration from the University of Kansas.


Ellen Galinsky, President and Co-Founder of Families and Work Institute (FWI) helped establish the field of work and family life while at Bank Street College of Education, where she was on the faculty for twenty-five years. Her more than forty-five books and reports include the best selling Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs, Ask The Children, the now classic The Six Stages of Parenthood and the highly acclaimed Workflex: The Essential Guide to Effective and Flexible Workplaces. She has published over 125 articles in academic journals, books and magazines


John Merrow “Nobody reports on the treasures and traumas of public education better than John Merrow. He is, quite simply, the leading education journalist in America.” ­ Jim Lehrer, former host of PBS NewsHour. John Merrow began his career as an education reporter with National Public Radio in 1974, with the weekly series, “Options in Education.” In 1984, he branched out into public television. He served as host of The Merrow Report, an award-winning documentary series, and currently is the Education Correspondent for PBS NewsHour as well as the founder and President of Learning Matters. Merrow’s work has taken him from community colleges to kindergarten classrooms, from the front lines of teacher protests to policy debates on Capitol Hill. His varied reporting has continually been on the forefront of education journalism. In the process, he’s won countless awards ­ including two Peabody Awards and four CINE Golden Eagles ­ and authored or edited a part of four books.


Stephanie Strow is president of the Washington Association for Middle Level Education (WAMLE). She has taught seventh and eighth grade English/language arts/social studies at Fairhaven Middle School, Bellingham, WA, for the past 12 years. She also serves as a trustee on the National Association for Middle Level Education (AMLE) Strow is a regular presenter at state and national conferences.


Gayle C. Manchin is past president of the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE and Vice-President of the WV State Board of Education. In addition to her duties as a member of the West Virgina State Board of Education, she served as West Virginia’s first lady; a commissioner on the West Virginia Commission for National and Community Service; the chairwoman of the Governor’s Healthy Lifestyles Coalition and the West Virginia Citizen’s Council on Children and Families; and as co-chair on the Governor’s 21st Century Jobs Cabinet and the Intellectual Infrastructure of Vision Shared. She is married to U.S. Senator Joe Manchin former Governor of West Virginia.


Keith R. Krueger (CAE) is CEO of the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), a national nonprofit organization that serves as the voice of K-12 technology leaders, especially school district CTO’s, who use technology strategically to improve teaching and learning. He has extensive background in nonprofit/association management and is particularly interested in using information technologies for education, health and libraries. He received a Masters of Arts in Public Affairs from the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota. He serves on the Advisory Boards for eSchool News, and Scholastic Administr@tor Magazine, GetNetWise and Generation Y. He is a past Board Member for the Organizations Concerned about Rural Education (OCRE) and served for many years as Board Member and Treasurer of the National Committee on Technology in Education & Training (NCTET). He has been honored as an eSchool News IMPACT 30 key national leader in educational technology.

 Cheryl Scott Williams is executive director of the Learning First Alliance, a coalition of 16 national K-12 education associations. Cheryl is a nationally recognized leader in education reform and improvement with extensive experience leading nonprofit boards and building successful board/staff relationships. Prior to coming to the Learning First Alliance, she served as a senior consultant at APQC. She was previously Vice President, Strategic Initiatives at Teachscape, a San Francisco based company that designs and delivers online, job-embedded professional development for teachers and principals. In addition, she has served as Vice President, Education at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), and she spent 14 years directing the Education Technology Program at the National School Boards Association (NSBA) before joining CPB. Williams is a past president of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), past board chair of the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), and current board member of the National Coalition for Technology in Education and Training (NCTET). She began her career in education as an English Language Arts teacher in Montgomery County, MD, and Fairfax County, VA. She holds a BA and MA in English and Secondary Education from the University of Maryland, College Park.

   Brian Lewis is the chief executive officer of The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Brian joined ISTE in 2012 following a 25-year career in both the public and private sectors. He served as the chief strategy officer and interim CEO for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), as executive director of the California Association of School Business Officials (CASBO), as assistant executive director for the California School Boards Association (CSBA), as director of governmental relations for the San Diego County Office of Education and the California County Superintendents Educational Services Association (CCSESA), and as senior legislative advocate for CSBA. He also has served as an elected school board member for the Dry Creek Joint Elementary School District in Roseville, California, USA. 

Carla Hannaford Ph.D. is a neurophysiologist and educator with experience as a professor of biology at the University of Hawaii and as a counselor for elementary and intermediate school children with learning difficulties. She presents and trains internationally on the neural basis of learning and educational kinesiology. In her bestselling book, Smart Moves: Why Learning Is Not All in Your Head, Dr. Hannaford states that our bodies are very much a part of all our learning, and learning is not an isolated "brain" function. Every nerve and cell is a network contributing to our intelligence and our learning capability. Many educators have found this work quite helpful in improving overall concentration in class.  

Hedda Bluestone Sharapan B.S, M.S. is Director of Early Childhood Initiatives at Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood. Hedda, who holds a B.S. in psychology from Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) and an M.S. in child development from the University of Pittsburgh, came to Family Communications in 1966. She is responsible for communicating Fred Rogers' philosophy in multiple ways: she develops workshops for early childhood educators; works on books, articles, and brochures for parents, families, and professionals; and speaks around the country to educators, parents, and religious, business, and community groups. Her two daughters, she says, "in a very real sense grew up in Mister Rogers' Neighborhood."

 John D. Musso is the Executive Director of the Association of School Business Officials International (ASBO). Musso has served for over 30 years in education having previously served as teacher, principal, CFO, and deputy superintendent. Musso is also an accomplished author and presenter on a various issues in education. The Association of School Business Officials International is a professional association that provides programs and services to promote the highest standards of school business management practices, professional growth, and the effective use of educational resources.

 

Rhonda Clements, Ed.D. is a professor in Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy at Manhattanville College. Dr. Clements received her Doctorate of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, from the Department of Movement Sciences and Education. Since that time, she has authored or edited 9 books and more than 20 articles in the area of movement, play, and game activities for children and has presented at more than 100 national and international conferences. Dr. Clements was one of eight experts to contribute to Active Start: A Statement of Physical Activity Guidelines for Children Birth to Five Years,which was sponsored by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education. In addition, Dr. Clements is the past president of the American Association for the Child's Right to Play (IPA/USA), and she has also served as a consultant to numerous state education departments, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to train Native American Head Start specialists, NAEYC, Sesame Street, Sesame Place, Nick Jr. Family Magazine, the Disney Channel, Crayola Crayons, and Parental Wisdom. She conducted a national survey for Wisk Laundry Detergent aimed at investigating the extent to which children are playing outdoors today.


Dennis J. Randolph, EFM is the Executive Director of the National School Plant Management Association. The association's mission is: "Excellence in Education through Professional Facility Management." Randolph has involved himself in non-profit educational organizations over the past 25 years serving as past president of the Washington Association of Maintenance and Operations Administrators and the National School Plant Management Association. In his current position with Roseburg Public Schools, he serves as the Physical Plant Manager. Randolph has spent the last 27 years in facility management. His personal and professional belief is that quality facilities promote quality learning for students and the learning community.

Jackee Duvall is the president of the Oregon Parent Teachers Association (PTA). Oregon PTA is the largest network of parents in the state, and they work at the local, state and national levels to support and improve Oregon schools. For over 100 years, Oregon PTA has partnered with educators to be a powerful voice for children, an important resource for parents and a strong advocate for public education. Oregon PTA consists of 9 regions, 4 councils, approximately 240 local PTAs, with a total of more than 23,000 members statewide.

 

Linda Geigle is the Executive Director of the National Association for Family Child Care. Previously, she was the Executive Director of Children First, Inc. in Salt Lake City, Utah as well as a family child care provider. Linda is also a past president, treasurer, and secretary of the National Association for Family Child Care. She also held the positions of president and secretary of the Professional Family Child Care Association of Utah.

 

Deborah Adam Dixon, MA,CCC-SLP. The school setting has been the focus of Deborah's career, as she has worked as a practitioner, administrator, state consultant, and state compliance monitor in Pennsylvania. She also served as a member of ASHA's Legislative Council, the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) and on various ASHA committees before joining the ASHA staff as the Director of School Services. 

 

Yasmina Vinci is the Executive Director of the National Head Start Association that represents more than one million children, 200,000 staff and 2,600 Head Start programs in the United States. She was a center director, policy maker in state government, funder and received her masters at Harvard with a focus on leading large scale change.  


Isis Artze-Vega, Ed.D. is Associate Director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching at Florida International University, where she works with faculty and graduate students to promote learning-centered teaching practices. Prior to joining FIU, she taught English Composition at the University of Miami.


Rae Adams is the Director of National University Professional Teaching & Leadership Development Center, La Jolla, CA. Previously she was a Teacher Performance Assessment Scorer--edTPA at Pearson North America; Contractual Consultant, Assessor, Standards Setter/Benchmarker, Facilitator, Grant Coordinator at National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and On-Line Project Manager and NBCT Network Leader at San Diego County Office of Education.


Thomas Armstrong, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of the American Institute for Learning and Human Development and an award-winning author and speaker who has been an educator for the past forty-one years. He is the author of fifteen books which have been translated into twenty-six languages. They include: Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, In Their Own Way, 7 Kinds of Smart, The Myth of the A.D.D. Child and The Power of Neurodiversity: Unleashing the Advantages of Your Differently Wired Brain. He has written for Ladies Home Journal, Family Circle, and Parenting, and articles featuring his work have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, USA Today, and Good Housekeeping. He has given nearly one thousand workshops, keynotes, and lectures in forty-four states and twenty-three countries over the past twenty-eight years.

Justin Jakovac is the Director of National Council for History Education, Director of Outreach and Technology at National Council for History Education Project, and Manager at National Council for History Education.

 


Marty Abbott is currently the Executive Director of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Prior to this, Marty served in the Fairfax County Public Schools as a language teacher, foreign language coordinator, and Director of High School Instruction. She has served on national committees to develop student standards, beginning teacher standards, and performance assessments in foreign languages. She was President of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in 2003. Marty also was co-chair of the national public awareness campaign 2005: The Year of Languages and now heads up the Lead with Languages national effort.


Dr. Bill East is Executive Director of the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) located in Alexandria, Virginia. NASDSE supports state education agencies and State Directors of Special Education in the 50 states and federal jurisdictions to improve outcomes for students with disabilities and their families. Bill has also served as a teacher and mental health professional.


Dan Cardinali is president of Communities In Schools, Inc., the nation's largest dropout prevention organization, with operations in 27 states and the District of Columbia. Established in 1977, Communities In Schools serves more than 1.25 million of America's most disenfranchised students each year. Under Cardinali's leadership, the organization has developed and embraced an evidence-based model of integrated student service provision and has launched a national growth strategy to increase the organization's impact on improving public education. Cardinali is a 2007 Annie E. Casey Children and Families Fellow. He also currently serves as a trustee for America's Promise, and as chairman of the board of directors of Peace First. Cardinali is a board member of The Harwood Institute of Public Innovation and Child Trends. In May 2011 Dan Cardinali was appointed by President Barack Obama to the Presidential Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. Trained as a community organizer in Guadalajara, Mexico, Cardinali served on a team organizing a "squatter" community of 120,000 to secure land rights, running water and public education. Cardinali holds a bachelor's degree in international relations from Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and a master's degree in philosophy from Fordham University.


Barnett Berryis CEO, Center for Teaching Quality. Barnett has taught in an urban high school, worked as a social scientist at the RAND Corporation, led policy initiatives at a state education agency, and served as a professor of education. He has authored numerous academic publications and articles for the popular education press. He frequently serves in an advisory capacity to organizations committed to teaching quality, equity, and social justice in America's schools. He loves working with teachers and helping to create opportunities for them to lead the transformation of their profession. He coauthored TEACHING 2030: What We Must Do for Our Students and our Public Schools (Teachers College Press, 2011) with eleven accomplished teachers. His most recent book, written with Ann Byrd and Alan Wieder, is Teacherpreneurs: Innovative Teachers Who Lead but Don't Leave (Jossey-Bass, 2013).

John Hill has served as a middle school mathematics teacher, middle and high school principal, assistant superintendent, and superintendent. His primary interests are those issues which impact rural schools and the role of instructional leaders at the district and building levels. He is also involved in the Purdue Educational Leadership Initiative for Small and Rural Schools and the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship program. .


James H. Wendorf is executive director of the National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD), which is committed to improving the lives of all people with learning difficulties and disabilities. He leads NCLD's strategic initiatives to empower parents, enable young adults, transform schools and create policy and advocacy impact. For the past three decades, Jim has worked in the not-for-profit sector to build national and international partnerships supporting children's learning and literacy. Prior to joining NCLD in 1999, he served as vice president and chief operating officer of Reading Is Fundamental, Inc., the nation's largest nonprofit children's literacy organization, based in Washington, D.C. Jim currently serves on the advisory board of the National Center on Educational Outcomes (University of Minnesota), the National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities, the Education Policy and Leadership Center (Southern Methodist University) and previously with a variety of civic and education organizations. He served as vice chair of the Congressionally authorized Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials in Postsecondary Education for Students with Disabilities. Jim is frequently called upon by the news media to comment on policies and programs affecting individuals who struggle to read and learn. He earned a B.A. degree from Yale College, and graduate degrees in English Language and Literature from the University of Cambridge and Cornell University.

Kari Arfstrom Flipped Learning Network (FLN) executive director Kari M. Arfstrom has over two decades of experience with K-12 education membership organizations (CoSN, NYLC, AESA and AASA). Prior to that, she worked for the U. S. House of Representatives. She is a current board member for the Rural School and Community Trust and a former board member for the National Coalition for Technology in Education and Training (NCTET), the Education and Libraries Network Coalition (EdLiNC), and the Organizations Concerned about Rural Education (OCRE). Dr. Arfstrom has a degree in English and licensure in secondary education from Augsburg College in Minneapolis and is a former language arts teacher in Minnesota. Her Master's degree is in Library and Information Science from the Catholic University in Washington, DC. Her Ph.D., from George Mason University in Fairfax, VA, is in Educational Leadership and Policy. 

 
Elizabeth "Betsy" Corcoran is responsible for keeping the whole EdSurge operation running. Betsy was previously Executive Editor for technology coverage at Forbes Media. Earlier she was an award-winning staff writer for the Washington Post and Scientific American. She has led professional development workshops on using IT in a public elementary school, where she also learned the fine art of coaxing incompatible systems to talk with one another and how to tame dust bunnies.



Sharon Darlingis President & Founder, National Center for Families Learning. NCFL is internationally recognized as the leader in the field of family literacy and family engagement and is well known for placing family literacy-parents and children learning together-on the agenda for social change in states and communities nationwide. Darling is a frequent advisor on education issues to governors, policymakers, business leaders, and philanthropists throughout the nation. She serves on numerous national and international boards and was featured on A&E's Biography series for her innovative approach to the education of families in poverty. Darling is the author of numerous articles and publications. The many awards she has received include the National Humanities Medal, the Albert Schweitzer Prize, and the Harold W. McGraw award.  

Glenda Bean is executive director of the Southern Early Childhood Association(SECA). Since 1948 the Southern Early Childhood Association has brought together preschool, kindergarten, and primary teachers and administrators, care givers, program directors, and individuals working with and for families, to promote quality care and education for young children. Over 20,000 individuals working in every aspect of child care and early childhood belong to SECA. They share ideas in local, state, and regional meetings, in professional development institutes, and through the association's resources.

 
Paula A. Cordeiro is the Dean of the School of Leadership and Education Sciences (SOLES) at the University of San Diego. Previously Dr. Cordeiro was the Coordinator of the masters and doctoral programs in Educational Leadership at The University of Connecticut. Cordeiro is a former teacher, principal and school head in international schools in Venezuela and Spain. In 2007 Paula was appointed to the board of The James Irvine Foundation in San Francisco and also serves on the Education Advisory Board of the Stuart Foundation. In 2009 she was elected to the board of the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE). Dr. Cordeiro is a past president of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA), and in 1998 was awarded a fellowship by the Commonwealth Council for Educational Administration and Management (FCCEAM). She is a former member of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, past President of the San Diego Council on Literacy, a founding member of the Academy of International School Heads, and a board member of the International Council for the Education of Teachers (ICET), and San Diego Grantmakers. In addition to numerous articles, Paula has published three books and is currently working on the fifth edition of her co-authored text (with William G. Cunningham): An Introduction to Educational Leadership: A Bridge to Improved Practice. Paula's research and teaching are in the areas of school leadership and global education.


Julie Underwood, a nationally recognized authority on school law, became the eighth dean of the UW-Madison School of Education in August 2005. Underwood taught at UW-Madison from 1986 to 1995 on the faculty of the Department of Educational Administration (now Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis). She has returned to Madison after serving from 1995 to 1998 as dean of Miami University’s School of Education and Allied Professions and from 1998 to 2005 as associate executive director and general counsel for the National School Boards Association in Washington, D.C. At the NSBA, she led a legal advocacy program on behalf of the nation’s public school boards, including producing friend-of-the-court briefs and legal strategies before the U.S. Supreme Court and lower courts. She also was responsible for the 3,000-member Council of School Attorneys. At UW-Madison, Underwood has served as chair of the Department of Educational Administration (1993-94), associate dean of the School of Education (1994-95), and co-director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Policy at the Robert M. La Follette Institute of Public Affairs (1990-93).


Fayneese Miller is dean of the College of Education and Social Services and professor of Human Development, Educational Leadership and Social Policy at the University of Vermont. Dr. Miller is a social psychologist who specializes in the psychosocial development of youth, with special emphasis on alienation, social identity, and cross-racial friendships. Dr. Miller serves on the U.S. Department of Justice's National Truancy Prevention Association (NTPA) Board. Her work includes a study on perceptions of racial/ethnic bias for the Rhode Island Supreme Court and a project on school-based truancy courts for the Rhode Island Family Court. She was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Science Task Force on diversity in higher education and the Annie Casey Foundation and Joint Center for Political Studies focus group on reproductive health. Dr. Miller is a member of the Vermont State Board of Education.


Dr. Deneese L. Jones began her service as Professor and Dean of the College of Education and Human Services at Longwood University on June 25, 2005. She succeeded Dr. Judy Johnson who had served as interim dean of the college for the previous year. Dr. Jones earned her Ph. D. in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis on literacy instruction and her Master of Education degree in the same discipline from Texas A&M University. Her Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education is from Texas Woman's University. A native of Dallas, Texas, Dr. Jones moved to Farmville from the University of Kentucky at Lexington, KY where she devoted fourteen years of her educational expertise at the state, national, and international level.


Dr. Hilda Rosselli After accepting a faculty position at USF, I was offered the chance to develop a Professional Development School for the College of Education. This gave me the chance to spend hundreds of hours at a local middle school where I supervised student teachers, taught both preservice and inservice courses at the school and worked with the school staff to implement various school improvement projects and studies. While at USF I also coordinated a master's degree program, served as the Director of the College of Education Honor's program and eventually was appointed Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs and then Associate Dean for Teacher Education. In 2002, I accepted my current position as Dean of the College of Education at Western Oregon University and drove across the United States with three cats, following the Oregon Trail, and listening to the adventures of Lewis and Clark on tape. I am delighted to have become an Oregonian and have developed new hobbies that include hiking, snowshoeing, and photographing sneaker waves on the Coast.


Dr. Angela Sewall who has been the dean of education at UALR since 1997, is also active in educational policy in other venues including her roles as a member and deans’ representative on the board of the Reading Recovery Council of North America, vice chair of the Unit Accreditation Board of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and a member of the NCATE Executive Board. She is a lead partner in the Arkansas Partnership for Teacher Quality (ArTQP), a national initiative for teacher quality, student learning and data quality supported by grants from AACTE and the National Education Association. Sewall has been a professor at UALR since 1992. Prior to that time, she worked for educational change and student learning in the Little Rock School District for 22 years, as a teacher, principal, and associate superintendent.


David Ritchey Ph.D., has been Executive Director of the Association of Teacher Educators since 2003. He has more than 20 years experience with trade and professional associations, most recently with the Association of School Business Officials International before coming to ATE. While with ASBO he was Director of Communications and Marketing, Director of Government and Public Affairs, and Interim Executive Director. As ASBO's Interim Executive Director he fulfilled all functions of the CEO for this 20-staff, $3.4 million budget association for nearly a year. He had previously been Number Two Staff Executive with the Architectural Woodwork Institute, and had worked with the Association of the Wall and Ceiling Industries International and the Institute of Industrial Launderers. Dr. Ritchey has completed graduate work at George Mason University and the University of Virginia, and he holds two Masters degrees (in sociology and public administration) and a Ph.D. in public administration.


Brenda Lilienthal Welburn served as the Executive Director of the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) from 1994 until 2012 and is known as an association manager and legislative professional with more than 35 years of experience in policy development and analysis in education and human service issues. Ms. Welburn began her career in social work, in Philadelphia Pennsylvania, specializing in casework services to foster children and their natural and foster families. She later became a Research Analyst with the U.S. House of Representatives' Select Committee on Assassinations. She went on to become a Legislative Assistant to the late Senator Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts covering a broad range of legislative issues including education, health and human services, child welfare services, and civil rights. A graduate of Howard University with graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania, Ms. Welburn is one of the nation's foremost experts on state education policy. She possesses not only professional expertise, but a unique historical perspective on the evolution of education governance and policy development at the state and federal levels. She has given workshops and presentations on state education policy in the United States around the nation and in several foreign countries. She has provided leadership training and board development in more than forty states.


Dr. Diane Levin Diane Levin is Professor of Education at Wheelock College in Boston, Massachusetts, where she teaches a service learning course on the reconciliation process underway in schools in Northern Ireland and a summer institute on “Media Madness and Children.” She has written eight books including: So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood and How Parents Can Protect Their Kids (with Jean Kilbourne), The War Play Dilemma, Teaching Young Children in Violent Times, and Remote Control Childhood?. She speaks around the world on the impact of violence, media and other societal issues on children, families and schools. Diane is also a founding member of the CCFC (Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood) and TRUCE (Teachers Resisting Unhealthy Children’s Entertainment).

Michael Rich, MD, MPH is Founder and Director of the Center on Media and Child Health at Children's Hospital Boston, committed to pursuing research, developing interventions on negative health effects of media, and creating health-positive media. He is Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, Assistant Professor in Society, Human Development, and Health at Harvard School of Public Health, and practices adolescent medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston. Dr. Rich is a former filmmaker and writer who worked in the film industry for 12 years, including two years in Japan as assistant director to Akira Kurosawa on Kagemusha, before attending medical school at Harvard.

Donna Mazyck is Executive Director of the National Association of School Nurses(NASN). Donna has spent half her nursing career in school health. She worked as a high school nurse and a state school nurse consultant. She provides leadership and consultation on student and school health issues for leaders of school health services programs, school nurses, families, school administrators, policy makers and organizations.

 

Eric Jensen is a former teacher with a real love of learning. While most of his experience is with secondary students, he has taught at every level, including at three universities. His academic background is in both the liberal and the science arts. He's currently a member of the Society for Neuroscience, NY Academy of Science, and is completing his PhD in psychology. Eric blends the science of teaching with the reality of today's instruction. Jensen has appeared on over 240 television and radio stations, including CNN. Articles on his work have appeared in USA Today, CNN, Wall Street Journal and major educational journals. He is the author of more than a dozen books, including Learning with the Body in Mind, Teaching with the Brain in Mind, and Enriching the Brain.

 

Craig Buschner, Ed.D. is a professor with the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, Chico. Dr. Buschner's teaching responsibilities include Foundations of Childhood Physical Education and Motor Development in Children. He is a member of the editorial boards for the Journal of Teaching Physical Education, Physical Educator, and the Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, and is the author of Teaching Children Movement Concepts and Skills: Becoming a Master Teacher, as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Dr. Buschner is currently serving as President of the National Association for Sport & Physical Education.


Jean Hovey is president of the Florida Parent Teacher Association (FPTA). PTA is the oldest and largest child advocacy association in the State of Florida. It received its charter in 1923 and have been advocating for children for eighty-eight years. Florida's PTA Board of Directors consists of 54 members from across the state. They represent children in Tallahassee and Washington D.C. and they serve on numerous committees at Department of Education, Department of Health, Race to The Top -to name a few. Several board members serve on National PTA Committees as well.


Dr. Lillian Katz is a graduate of Stanford University and an international leader in early childhood education. She taught at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for more than three decades, as well as directing the ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education (ERIC/EECE) for more than 30 years.

 

Dr. Rebecca Isbell is Director of the Center of Excellence in Early Childhood Learning and Development and a professor of early childhood education at East Tennessee State University. She received the Distinguished Faculty Award for Teaching in 1994. Dr. Isbell has a wide variety of teaching experiences that have influenced her thinking about young children and their families. These include teaching music in grades K-5, teaching three-year-olds, teaching graduate students, and supervising early childhood student teachers. Her many publications have inspired early childhood professionals to create environments that work, are aesthetically pleasing and include centers that match the unique interests of the children in the classroom. Instructors in college classes throughout the United States and Canada have used her two textbooks, enriching their understanding of children's literature and creativity and the arts. The Complete Learning Center Book is a classic in the field and continues to be a major source for center design. Her newest book, The Learning Spaces for Infants and Toddlers, provides this same usable framework to spaces for infants and toddlers.

Joan Almon is the Chair of the U.S. Alliance for Childhood (www.allianceforchildhood.org), a broad-based group advocating social change for children to improve their overall health and well-being. The Alliance currently places a special focus on the restoration of creative play in the lives of children. Joan was a Waldorf kindergarten teacher in Maryland for nearly 20 years and then spent a decade consulting with Waldorf early childhood centers in North America, Africa, Asia and other parts of the world.

 

Dr.Richard Wong has a diverse career in education, publishing, and association management. In March, 2000, he became the Executive Director of the American School Counselor Association, a non-profit organization that supports and represents school counselors on a national and international scope. Previously, he had served as the Deputy Executive Director for the Public Risk Management Association in Arlington, Va., and as an editor for Simon & Schuster, Los Angeles, where he managed publication of three magazines. He started his professional career as an English and journalism teacher. Dr. Wong has written numerous books and other publications about education, school counseling and risk management, including Public Entity Risk Management, the textbook used for the public sector specialization of the Associate in Risk Management designation. He currently serves on several boards and committees, including the Alliance for Consumer Education Board of Trustees and the Learning First Alliance Board of Directors. 

Julie A. Walker is Executive Director of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). Prior to serving in this capacity, Walker was the Director of Library & Media Services for the Round Rock (TX) ISD. For the past fourteen years, she has been responsible for directing a number of national programs, including the development of the association’s learning standards and guidelines for school library media programs. Walker currently serves on the advisory committee for the Laura Bush Foundation for America’s Libraries. She is the immediate Past Chair for the Partnership for 21st Century Skills.    


Jim McGarry has been serving as National School Supply and Equipment Association (NSSEA) President/CEO since April 2011. In this role he works with the volunteer boards and committees to set the direction of the association and conduct the industry's two major annual tradeshows and conferences, Ed Expo and EdSpaces. He previously served as President and Chief Operating Officer of the Independent Office Products and Furniture Dealers Association (IOPFDA), formerly the Business Products Industry Association (BPIA). He was instrumental in working with the Board of Directors to transition the organization and create a sustainable future for IOPFDA's two alliances, the National Office Products Alliance (NOPA) and the Office Furniture Dealers Alliance (OFDA).